Category: temples

Every Egyptian Temple Reflected The Way Their …

historical-nonfiction:

The ancient Egyptians believed that at first there was nothing but water. Then a mound appeared from the water. This creation myth reflects their yearly Nile flood, when the river’s waters covered the land, and then life-giving silt emerged as the waters receded.

Each temple they built represented that primordial mound of creation. In temple architecture, that mound was represented by a gradual rise in ground level between the entrance and the innermost shrine. Every temple also had a sacred lake, like the one above at Karnak, and each temple was surrounded by an undulating mudbrick wall. Because of course something as minor as a wall need to have a meaning, it is thought that the undulating wall represents the primordial ocean that the mound of creation rose from.

Stones assembled in upright manners, obelisks …

Stones assembled in upright manners,
obelisks and temple walls.
Peaks of stone not drawn from mountains,
shining metal, gleaming capstones.

High angle view of the temple of Luxor

High angle view of the temple of Luxor

Facade of the Temple of Kalabsha, 1880

Facade of the Temple of Kalabsha, 1880

Interior of the Temple of Khonsu at Karnak, 1…

Interior of the Temple of Khonsu at Karnak,

1910

Colossus of Ramesses II on the right side of…

Colossus of Ramesses II on the right side of the Great Temple of Abu Simbel. Lower Nubia, 1870s. Antonio Beato (British, 1832-1906).

The Eighth Pylon, Karnak, Thebes, 1911 (wate…

The Eighth Pylon, Karnak, Thebes, 1911 (watercolour over pencil)

Augustus Osborne Lamplough (British, 1877-1930)

Ruins of the Temple of Thoth in Dakka, Nubia. …

Ruins of the Temple of Thoth in Dakka, Nubia. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. Photograph late 19th century.

Facade of Great temple of Ramesses II, Abu Sim…

Facade of Great temple of Ramesses II, Abu Simbel

Second courtyard of Mortuary Temple of Rames…

Second courtyard of Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III, Medinet Habu, 1890