Category: Re

egypt-museum:

The Sun God Re

Illustration associated with the ‘Litany of Re’ depicts the sun god in his ram-headed form, detail of a painting in the joint tomb of Ramesses V and Ramesses VI (KV9). New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, ca. 1189-1070 BC. Valley of the Kings, West Thebes.

“Ra” by KateMaxpaint (DeviantArt)

blogssuchasthis:

Itty-bitty Ra
Just because, we all need a tiny king god.

nerdwingarts:

Ra and Apophis 

asethepetwi:

inonibird:

Eclipse

This is my favorite thing and I’ll never not-reblog ot

grandegyptianmuseum:

Banebdjedet of Mendes 

Illustration of the god Banebdjedet or

Banebdjed (“Ba of the Lord of Mendes”) depicted with four rams’ heads. He was the ba of Ra, Shu, Geb and Osiris.

poke-a-doodle-doo:

 "Wait, you’re supposed to weight it first!“

Cover for my next artbook which will  be available in April!

In case you’re wondering, that’s my version of “Weighing of the Heart”
from the Book of Dead” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_the_Dead

digitalessence:

Ancient Egyptian gods by Yliade.

egyptianways:

Egyptian Dieties associated with The Sun

— Bast, cat goddess associated with the sun

— Horus, god of the sky whose right eye was considered to be the sun and his left the moon

— Amun, creator deity sometimes identified as a sun god

— Atum, the “finisher of the world”, who represents the sun as it sets

— Aten, god of the sun, the visible disc of the sun

— Khepri, god of rebirth and the sunrise

— Nefertem, god of healing and beauty, who represents the first sunlight

— Ra, god of the sun

— Sekhmet, goddess of war and of the sun, and sometimes plagues and creator of the desert

— Sopdu, god of war and the scorching heat of the summer sun

— Ptah, god of craftsmanship, the arts and fertility, sometimes said to represent the sun at night

— Khnum, god of sunset

grandegyptianmuseum:

Adoration of Ra

Osiris as the Djed Pillar holding the Disc of the Sun God Ra, supported by an ankh symbol representing Life, surrounded by Isis and Nephthys. Egyptian Book of the Dead, Papyrus of Ani. New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, ca. 1250 BC. Now in the British Museum.