Category: mythology

Isis receiving offerings, detail of a wall rel…

Isis receiving offerings, detail of a wall relief from the Temple of Isis, Philae

Isis, Goddess of Kingship and Magic, wearing…

Isis, Goddess of Kingship and Magic, wearing the two-feathered crown, with snakes wrapped around her arms. Ptolemaic Period, 1st century BC. Now in

the Walters Art Museum.

Mythological scene from Book of the Dead of Tu…

Mythological scene from Book of the Dead of Tutankhamun’s third gilded shrine. Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

The Canopic shrine found in Tutankhamun …

The

Canopic

shrine found in Tutankhamun ’s tomb is

protected by

four statues of Goddesses, Isis, Nephthys, Serqet (Serket) and Neith. Valley of the Kings, West Thebes.

Reliefs from the Temple of Khnum, Esna

Reliefs from the Temple of Khnum, Esna

The opening of the mouth ceremony, detail of…

The opening of the mouth ceremony, detail of a wall relief from the Tomb of Sennedjem

(TT1). New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, ca. 1292-1189 BC. Deir el-Medina, West Thebes.

Statue of the god Horus as a falcon (bronze,…

Statue of the god Horus as a falcon (bronze, 38.5 x 21 cm). Ptolemaic Period, ca. 305-30 BC.

Now in the Mediterranean Archaeology Museum, Marseille.

Furniture ornament in the form of a cobra …

Furniture ornament in the form of a cobra (gold)

The cobra was a much feared and respected creature in Egypt. It possessed many different associations, particularly with royalty, and use of the symbol meant that the dangerous power of the cobra was always magically turned to the benefit of the user. Thus the king’s uraeus, worn on his brow, is referred to in some battle texts as destroying his enemies and giving the king power over them. The rearing cobra also represents the goddess Wadjet, patron of the town of Buto. She and the vulture goddess Nekhbet, of el-Kab, represented Lower and Upper Egypt respectively and were shown wearing the appropriate red and white crowns. Together they were the tutelary goddesses of the third name of the king, the so-called “two ladies” name, placing him under their protection. Hence the uraeus represents both Wadjet and the power immanent in the cobra.

Roman Period, ca. 30 BC –

641

AD. Now in the British Museum.

Scene from Book of Caverns showing the sun god…

Scene from Book of Caverns showing the sun god Ra in his ram-headed form stretching out his wings to emerge from the darkness of the underworld.

Tomb of Twosret and Setnakhte (KV14). New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, ca. 1189-1077 BC. Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Photo: Francesco Gasparetti/Flickr

Sennedjem and his wife facing a naos contain…

Sennedjem and his wife facing a naos containing thirteen divinities, with Osiris and Ra-Horakhty leading each row, from the west wall of Tomb of Sennedjem. New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, ca. 1290 BC. Deir el-Medina, West Thebes.