Category: Mummy

“This volume contains the proceedings of the t…

“This volume contains the proceedings of the twenty-third Annual Egyptological Colloquium, held at the British Museum in 2014, augmented by additional papers. The twenty-three contributions investigate functionality, iconography and manufacture of ancient Egyptian coffins from the First Intermediate Period to the eighth century AD. The authors explore the conceptual aspects which lay behind the production of coffins through the study of iconography and texts, examining the functional role of these complex objects as ‘structured compositions’ which were designed to play an important part in transforming the deceased occupants and perpetuating their existence beyond death. Reinstating coffins in their archaeological and societal contexts, the papers reflect on the circumstances in which they were made, considering workshop practices and regional variability, and studying coffins not only individually but also as components of larger conceptual entities in which the mummy, the burial chamber and the tomb itself all had specific meanings. Several contributions focus on areas of current interest, such as the post-burial adaptation and reuse of coffins, considering how these issues relate to the economic environment in which they were made and to changing attitudes towards the immutability of burial arrangements.”

Ancient Egyptian Coffins: Craft traditions and functionality, Taylor, J. & M. Vandenbeusch, eds., British Museum Publications on Egypt and Sudan 4, London, Peeters Publishers

Mummy inside the Coffin of Djedjehutyiuefank…

Mummy inside the Coffin of Djedjehutyiuefankh 

Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh (whose name means ‘The god Thoth says “May he live”’) was a member of a family of priests from the city of Thebes, where he served the warlike god Montu. This spectacular nest of three coffins containing his mummy was found in 1895, together with that of his mother, buried within the grounds of the temple at Deir el-Bahari.  

Third Intermediate Period, 25th Dynasty, ca. 770–712 BC. Now in the Ashmolean Museum,

Oxford. AN1895.153, 155-156

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RAMSES II: THE MUMMY WHO HAD TO GET A Passport

RAMSES II’S PASSPORT

Believe it or not, in 1976 Pharaoh Ramses II was issued an Egyptian passport for passage to France nearly three millennia after his death.

Ramses II, a king in ancient Egypt, was immensely popular and considered by many to be the most powerful Pharaoh to have lived. The son of Seti I, Ramses was named Prince Regent when he was 14 years old and is believed to have taken the throne before reaching 20.

The young Pharaoh led numerous military campaigns, besting pirates, conquering empires abroad, and squashing rebellions at home. His military prowess stuffed the state coffers allowing him to build enormous monuments and vast tombs for himself.

The pyramids had been built 1,500 years before Ramses’s time. Instead of focusing on the construction of a single great monument, he had buildings all up and down the Nile River constructed in his honor. Most Pharaoh’s had their statues carved shallowly into stone, making it easy for successors to destroy or remake them in their own image. He instead instructed his masons to carve his likeness deeply into the stone, giving his statues a unique and lasting style.

He was responsible for the construction of the Abu Simbel temple and the Ramesseum—an enormous mortuary temple. Among his more notable monuments are a tomb for his lover Nefertari and a colossal statue weighing over 100 tons.

BURIAL AND TOMB

Ramses II was originally buried in a grand tomb in the Valley of the Kings, but was subsequently moved many times by priests who feared looters. He spent as little as three days in some places, and the priests recorded their actions on the wrappings on his body. Despite his resplendent wealth and power in life, his sarcophagus was lost to history, and by the time of his rediscovery, he was in deteriorating condition.

It was his poor condition that prompted Egyptian authorities to seek help preserving him in the mid-1970s. They found their experts in France and reluctantly decided to transport the 3,000-year-old mummy to Paris.

A sarcophagus with a mummy uncovered in Late P…

archaeologicalnews:

Excavations carried out by an Egyptian mission near the Aga Khan Mausoleum on Aswan’s west bank uncovered an anthropoid sandstone sarcophagus with a mummy inside of a Late Period tomb.

Mostafa Waziri, the secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, told Ahram Online that the mummy inside the sarcophagus is wrapped in linen and in a very good conservation condition.

Waziri pointed out that more studies are needed to identify the sarcophagus’ owner.

He noted that the mission also uncovered a couple of Late Period tombs with walls decorated with scenes depicting several deities such as Isis, Hathor, and Anubis. Read more.

The mummified body of pharaoh Ramesses II, als…

The mummified body of pharaoh Ramesses II, also known as Ramesses the Great, found in the tomb TT320 Royal Cache at Deir el-Bahari. He often is regarded as the greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh of the Egyptian Empire. 

Reign of Ramesses II. New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, ca. 1279-1213 BC. The mummy is now displayed in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

The Egyptian Widow, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 18…

The Egyptian Widow, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1872

The Frisian artist Alma-Tadema was a great success in England, where he was even knighted. His representations of ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman scenes made him one of the most popular 19th-century painters. In this picture, full of archaeological details, a woman is mourning beside the inner mummy case containing the body of her husband. His sarcophagus stands at left, while priests and singers lament the departed. Rijksmuseum

A sarcophagus with a mummy uncovered in Late P…

archaeologicalnews:

Excavations carried out by an Egyptian mission near the Aga Khan Mausoleum on Aswan’s west bank uncovered an anthropoid sandstone sarcophagus with a mummy inside of a Late Period tomb.

Mostafa Waziri, the secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, told Ahram Online that the mummy inside the sarcophagus is wrapped in linen and in a very good conservation condition.

Waziri pointed out that more studies are needed to identify the sarcophagus’ owner.

He noted that the mission also uncovered a couple of Late Period tombs with walls decorated with scenes depicting several deities such as Isis, Hathor, and Anubis. Read more.

Mummified monkey, from Tomb KV50 nearby tomb o…

Mummified monkey, from Tomb KV50 nearby tomb of Amenhotep II (KV35), found by Mr. Theodore M. Davis. Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

Prehistoric mummy reveals ancient Egyptian emb…

archaeologicalnews:

It is the first time that extensive tests have been carried out on an intact prehistoric mummy, consolidating the researchers’ previous findings that embalming was taking place 1,500 years earlier than previously accepted.

Dating from c.3700-3500 BC, the mummy has been housed in the Egyptian Museum in Turin since 1901, but unlike the majority of other prehistoric mummies in museums, it has never undergone any conservation treatments, providing a unique opportunity for accurate scientific analysis.

Like its famous counterpart Gebelein Man A in the British Museum, the Turin mummy was previously assumed to have been naturally mummified by the desiccating action of the hot, dry desert sand.

Using chemical analysis, the scientific team led by the Universities of York and Macquarie uncovered evidence that the mummy had in fact undergone an embalming process, with a plant oil, heated conifer resin, an aromatic plant extract and a plant gum/sugar mixed together and used to impregnate the funerary textiles in which the body was wrapped. Read more.

Mummified monkey found by Theodore M. Davis …

Mummified monkey found by Theodore M. Davis in the tomb of Amenhotep II (ca. 1400 BC). Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Cairo.