Category: Hatshepsut

grandegyptianmuseum: The Mortuary Temple of Ha…

grandegyptianmuseum:

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes

grandegyptianmuseum: Relief from the Red Cha…

grandegyptianmuseum:

Relief from the Red Chapel of Hatshepsut

She is depicted as a male pharaoh and joins Seshat (goddess of wisdom, knowledge, and writing) in the foundation ceremony required to demarcate a construction site. 

Reign of Hatshepsut. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1478-1458 BC. The Red Chapel, Karnak Temple Complex. 

Painted relief of members of Hatshepsut&rs…

Painted relief of

members

of Hatshepsut’s trading expedition to the mysterious ‘Land of Punt’, 15th century BC. Temple of Hatshepsut, Deir el-Bahari

grandegyptianmuseum: Three statues of queen Ha…

grandegyptianmuseum:

Three statues of queen Hatshepsut (ca. 1507-1458 BC) in row, kneeling and making an offering of wine, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

The stairs leading to Hatshepsut’s Tem…

The stairs leading to Hatshepsut’s Temple at Deir El Bahari

Pharaoh Hatshepsut

Pharaoh Hatshepsut

Queen Ati, the wife of the King of Punt depi…

Queen Ati, the wife of the King of Punt depicted in a relief at the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut,

15th century BC. Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes.

“Interestingly, images of Hatshepsut as quee…

“Interestingly, images of Hatshepsut as queen – from before her claim to the throne – were left untouched. Only reliefs and statuary that supported the presumption of her kingship were revised. Thutmose III was attacking only Hatshepsut’s kingly ambitions and actions, not her soul as a woman or a human being. In fact, he seems to have been content to coexist with her depictions as God’s Wife, King’s Daughter, and King’s Wife. But portraits and texts showing her as king caused him grief, enough to create an ideological purge twenty-five years after her death.”

The Woman Who Would Be King, by Kara Cooney

Valley of the Kings and Hatshepsut Temple

Valley of the Kings and Hatshepsut Temple

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as the Djeser-Djeseru (Ancient Egyptian: ḏsr ḏsrw “Holy of Holies”), is a mortuary temple of Ancient Egypt located in Upper Egypt. Built for the Eighteenth Dynasty pharaoh Hatshepsut, it is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el-Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings. This mortuary temple is dedicated to Amun and Hatshepsut and is situated next to the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II, which served both as an inspiration and later, a quarry. It is considered one of the “incomparable monuments of ancient Egypt.

Valley of the Kings and Hatshepsut Temple

Valley of the Kings and Hatshepsut Temple

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as the Djeser-Djeseru (Ancient Egyptian: ḏsr ḏsrw “Holy of Holies”), is a mortuary temple of Ancient Egypt located in Upper Egypt. Built for the Eighteenth Dynasty pharaoh Hatshepsut, it is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el-Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings. This mortuary temple is dedicated to Amun and Hatshepsut and is situated next to the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II, which served both as an inspiration and later, a quarry. It is considered one of the “incomparable monuments of ancient Egypt.