Category: Hatshepsut

Image of Hathor as a cow

Image of Hathor as a cow

Relief depicting Hatshepsut seated before goddess Hathor in the form of a cow, detail of a wall carving from the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, Deir el-Bahari.

grandegyptianmuseum: Aerial view of the Mortu…

grandegyptianmuseum:

Aerial view of the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes

Great and mighty Queen, ruler of Egypt, that l…

Great and mighty Queen,
ruler of Egypt,
that land of greatest
divinest majesty.

With beauty oh so striking,
both of mind and of body,
Ruling over a great land
with power almighty.

Wife of two great men,
an Emperor all powerful,
though many years her senior,
Julius Caesar himself.

A second great at shows,
a master of war and propaganda,
though a little too Essenic,
Marc Antony the lecherous.

Mother to four children,
Ptolemy Caesarion by Julius Caesar,
Alexander Helios and Ptolemy Philadelphus by Antony,
as well as her daughter Cleopatra Selene.

Sister to four siblings,
Bernice, executed for treason by their father,
Ptolemy IX and Ptolemy X
and the dreaded Arsinoe III.

Her parents from a long line
of powerful Greek descent,
from Ptolemy I,
half-brother to Alexander the Great.

A student of the best scholars,
studying under Euclid
the Father of Geometry,
knowing nine languages herself.

A philosopher and scientist,
author of her own book,
Cosmetiques.
This is the Cleopatra unmentioned.

Instead are talked about
her illustrious ‘blow them’ parties,
orgies where she was the only woman,
and men falling all over themselves.

Legends are spread around
about a woman full of herself,
an ego-maniac with a god complex,
They placed it out of context.

She grew up in a country
where women could own property,
where divorce was not only a thing,
but where women could initiate it.

Alexandria was the cradle of knowledge,
its library the only true treasure in the world.
It possessed great universities,
where women not only went but taught.

Women wore jewelry and make-up,
adorning themselves as was only right.
Color was smeared everywhere one looked,
and diversity was fostered as a guiding light.

Women could rule this great land
with or without a man beside them.
Hatshepsut had done is centuries prior,
Neithhotep long before even her.

Her country was an empire of trade,
the end destination of the Silk Road,
the entry point of Nubian gold,
the bread basket of the East.

Egypt was a land of rarities,
where salts and minerals abound,
where spices lingered on the tongue,
where incense rare was easily found.

Music and literature and dancing
long before Greeks patented it,
was found in this delta alive,
great Pharaohs fostering.

In a land made rich by her advising,
who could begrudge her some fun?
Even if the legends tempting
turn out to be true, I couldn’t blame her, could you?

Aerial view of the Mortuary Temple of Hatshe…

Aerial view of the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes

grandegyptianmuseum:

grandegyptianmuseum:

Three statues of queen Hatshepsut (ca. 1507-1458 BC) in row, kneeling and making an offering of wine, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

historicwomendaily:

historicwomendaily:

Notable native queens of Egypt

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-B…

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, near the Valley of the Kings, 19th century.

Oil painting by Walter Prell (1857-1936). David David Gallery, Pennsylvania

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-B…

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, near the Valley of the Kings, 19th century.

Oil painting by Walter Prell (1857-1936). David David Gallery, Pennsylvania

ancientpeoples: The Goddess Nekhbet, from th…

ancientpeoples:

The Goddess Nekhbet, from the Temple of Hatshepsut

Painted scale copy (tempera on paper) of the temple painting by Charles K. Wilkinson, 1920s.  

Original from Deir al-Bahri, Thebes, Upper Egypt.  Dated to the New Kingdom, 

Dynasty 18, ca. 1479–1458 B.C. (joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III).

Nekhbet is depicted as a vulture, often hovering over an image of the pharaoh and clutching a shen symbol (representing eternal encircling protection) in her talons.

Source: Met Museum

grandegyptianmuseum: The Mortuary Temple of Ha…

grandegyptianmuseum:

The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes