Category: egyptology

“Life can be a challenge when your mother gi…

“Life can be a challenge when your mother gives your friends dead mice in your birthday goody bags and offers to mummify your class pet bunny. Amun Ra (yes, like the Egyptian god) shares the story of his endlessly embarrassing and unconventional life with his Mummy, the famous Egyptologist Amilas Marquis.

He regales his readers with adventures of crossing continents, of narrow escapes with stolen artifacts, of death defying run-ins with scorpions, not to mention the humiliation in the face of his peers, with his mother’s graphic stories of ancient rites and severed body parts. Along the way, he shares his knowledge about ancient Egypt and the modern Middle East, as well as Europe and North America.”

Fun Things to Do with Dead Animals: Egyptology, Ruins, My Life, by

Eden Unger Bowditch, Salima Ikram.

The American University in Cairo Press.

“Pharaoh Seti I ruled Egypt for only 11 years …

“Pharaoh Seti I ruled Egypt for only 11 years (1290-1279 BC), but his reign marked a revival of Egyptian military and economic power, as well as cultural and religious life. Seti was born the son of a military officer in northern Egypt, far from the halls of power in Memphis and Thebes. However, when the last king of the 18th Dynasty, Horemheb, died without an heir, Seti’s father was named king. He ruled for only two years before dying of old age, leaving Seti in charge of an ailing superpower. 

Seti set about rebuilding Egypt after a century of dynastic struggles and religious unrest. He reasserted Egypt’s might with a series of campaigns across the Levant, Libya and Nubia. He despatched expeditions to mine for copper, gold, and quarry for stone in the deserts, laying the foundations for one of the most ambitious building projects of any Egyptian Pharaoh and his actions allowed his son, Ramesses the Great to rule in relative peace and stability for 69 years, building on the legacy of his father.”

― Pharaoh Seti I: Father of Egyptian Greatness, by Nicky Nielsen

Preorder US // Preorder UK

“King Sethy I (also transcribed as Seti, Sethi…

“King Sethy I (also transcribed as Seti, Sethi and Sethos) ruled for around a decade in the early thirteenth century BC. His lifetime coincided with a crucial point in Egyptian history, following the ill-starred religious revolution of Akhenaten, and heralding the last phase of Egypt’s imperial splendor. 

As the second scion of a wholly new royal family, his reign did much to set the agenda for the coming decades, both at home and abroad. Sethy was also a great builder, apparently with exquisite artistic taste, to judge from the unique quality of the decoration of his celebrated monuments at Abydos and Thebes.”

Sethy I, King of Egypt: His Life and Afterlife, by Aidan Dodson

“This fascinating saga spans 3,000 years of Eg…

“This fascinating saga spans 3,000 years of Egyptian queenship from Early Dynastic times until the suicide of Cleopatra in 30 BC. Starting with the unique role enjoyed by Egypt’s women in the ancient world, the book goes on to present a biographical portrait of every queen, supplemented by a wealth of pictorial detail, datafiles, genealogical trees, timelines, and special features―from Childbirth to Wigs―highlighting different aspects of Egyptian culture.

The queen of Egypt was, first and foremost, a supportive wife and mother, but in times of dynastic crisis she was expected to act as her husband’s deputy. The queen might be required to marshal troops, or to rule on behalf of an infant son. She might even be called upon to rule in her own right in the absence of a suitable king. The female pharaohs Hatshepsut and Tawosret, the sun queens Tiy and Nefertiti, the seductive Nefertari and Cleopatra: many of Egypt’s queens have left an indelible mark on their country’s history.”

Chronicle of the Queens of Egypt: From Early Dynastic Times to the Death of Cleopatra

“The Egypt that so enticed and enchanted intre…

“The Egypt that so enticed and enchanted intrepid archaeologist-sleuth Amelia Peabody in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries was a place of wonder, mystery, danger, and the lure of antiquity. Now, with this monumental volume of Egyptian culture, history, and arcania, readers will be able to immerse themselves in the great lady’s world more completely than ever before.

Journey through the bustling streets and markets of Cairo a hundred years ago. Surround yourself with the customs and color of a bygone time. Explore ancient tombs and temples and marvel at the history of this remarkable land – from the age of the pharaohs through the Napoleonic era to the First World War. Also included in Amelia Peabody’s Egypt are a hitherto unpublished journal entry and intimate biographies of the Emersons and their friends, which provide a uniquely personal view of the lives, relationships, opinions, politics, and delightful eccentricities of mystery’s first family, as well as unforgettable pearls of wit and wisdom from everyone’s favorite fictional Egyptologist herself.”

Amelia Peabody’s Egypt, by Elizabeth Peters

“Amarna Sunset tells the story of the declin…

“Amarna Sunset tells the story of the decline and fall of the pharaoh Akhenaten’s religious revolution in the fourteenth century bc. Beginning at the regime’s high point in his Year 12, it traces the subsequent collapse that saw the deaths of many of the king’s loved ones, his attempts to guarantee the revolution through co-rulers, and the last frenzied assault on the god Amun. 

The book then outlines the events of the subsequent five decades that saw the extinction of the royal line, an attempt to place a foreigner on Egypt’s throne, and the accession of three army officers in turn. Among its conclusions are that the mother of Tutankhamun was none other than Nefertiti, and that the queen was joint-pharaoh in turn with both her husband Akhenaten and her son.”

Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian Counter-Reformation, by Aidan Dodson

“The Amduat (literally “that which is in…

“The Amduat (literally “that which is in the netherworld”) tells the story of the nocturnal journey of Re, the Egyptian Sungod, through the netherworld from the time when the sun dies, after setting in the west, to its rebirth at sunrise in the east. In the middle of the night, in the profoundest depths of the netherworld, this resurrection is made possible by a mystical union of the sun with the mummified body of Osiris, god of the dead. This great mystery of the union between the freely moving soul of the Sungod, longing for the bright and boundless sky, with Osiris’s corpse, which is irrevocably bound to the subterranean realm of the dead, evokes the renewal of all life and the restoration of totality.

In the Egyptian belief system, the pharaohs and in later times all blessed dead embarked on this same “night-sea journey” after death, ultimately becoming one with Re and living forever. The vision of the afterlife elaborated in the Amduat, dating from around 1500 B.C.E., has been influential for millennia, providing the model for an entire genre of Egyptian literature, the Books of the Afterlife, which in turn endured into the Greco-Roman era. Its themes and images persisted into gnostic and alchemical texts and made their way into early Christian portrayals of the beyond.”

The Sungod’s Journey through the Netherworld: Reading the Ancient Egyptian Amduat, by Andreas Schweizer

Wall relief depicting the Rekhyt bird (lapwing…

Wall relief depicting the Rekhyt bird (lapwing) with human arms raised, in an act of adoration, and wings pinned back, in an act of submission.

The combination of hieroglyphs must be read the whole people of Egypt worships the king. Temple of Sobek and Haroeris, Kom Ombo.

Wooden statuette of a bearer from the tomb o…

Wooden statuette of a bearer from the tomb of Niankhpepi

The figure of the bearer falls within the category of domestic servants, fated to serve their master for eternity.This one was found with many others in the tomb of a high dignitary of the 6th Dynasty called Niankhpepi.

The inscription of all titles on the base of the statue informs us that he was referred to as"the black". The servant is shown advancing carrying a pack on his back decorated with a leopard skin and fitted with a support for it to be rested on the ground. His right hand holds a wicker container decorated with geometric patterns. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

“Where are the tombs of Alexander the Great …

“Where are the tombs of Alexander the Great or Cleopatra? Both rulers were buried in Egypt, but their tombs have never been found despite years of intensive research and excavation. Yet we have tantalizing clues. Searching for the Lost Tombs of Egypt describes the quest for these and other great ‘missing’ tombs – those we know existed, but which have not yet been identified. It also discusses key moments of discovery that have yielded astonishing finds and created the archetypal image of the archaeologist poised at the threshold of a tomb left untouched for millennia.

Tombs, mummies, and funerary items make up a significant portion of the archaeological remains that survive ancient Egypt and have come to define the popular perception of Egyptology. Despite the many sensational discoveries in the last century, such as the tomb of Tutankhamun, the tombs of some of the most famous individuals in the ancient world―Imhotep, Nefertiti, Alexander the Great, and Cleopatra―have not yet been found.”

― Searching for the Lost Tombs of Egypt, by Chris Naunton

UK residents  Pre-order US