Category: egyptology

“One of the world’s oldest treaties provides t…

“One of the world’s oldest treaties provides the backdrop for a new analysis of the Egyptian concept of hetep (“peace”). To understand the full range of meaning of hetep, Peace in Ancient Egypt explores battles against Egypt’s enemies, royal offerings to deities, and rituals of communing with the dead. Vanessa Davies argues that hetep is the result of action that is just, true, and in accord with right order (maat). Central to the concept of hetep are the issues of rhetoric and community. Beyond detailing the ancient Egyptian concept of hetep, it is hoped that this book will provide a useful framework that can be considered in relation to concepts of peace in other cultures.”

― Peace in Ancient Egypt (Harvard Egyptological Studies), by Vanessa Davies

“Egyptian society is often said to have been…

“Egyptian society is often said to have been divided into social classes, with the pat -people representing the ‘elite’ and the rxyt -people being the ‘commoners’. The aim of this study is to provide the first comprehensive analysis of the role of the rxyt -people in Egyptian religion by utilizing both text and iconography. This includes exploring their identity, their participation in Egyptian rituals and temple festivals, and a detailed examination of the rxyt rebus.”

― 

All the Rxyt-people Adore: The Role of the Rekhyt-people in Egyptian Religion (GHP Egyptology), by Kenneth Griffin

“In today’s political landscape, female …

“In today’s political landscape, female rulers are few and far between, But thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme, controlling the authoritarian state as power brokers in times of war and peace. Even with their success, these political masterminds were just as often used as pawns in a patriarchal society. Through the seductive lens of six remarkable female pharaohs―including Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra―celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney explains how these women ruled and what made ancient Egypt unique among history’s greatest empires. Her remarkable book illuminates the complexities of their unusual power―and why its like has never been seen since.”

When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt, by Kara Cooney

“In today’s political landscape, female …

“In today’s political landscape, female rulers are few and far between, But thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme, controlling the authoritarian state as power brokers in times of war and peace. Even with their success, these political masterminds were just as often used as pawns in a patriarchal society. Through the seductive lens of six remarkable female pharaohs―including Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra―celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney explains how these women ruled and what made ancient Egypt unique among history’s greatest empires. Her remarkable book illuminates the complexities of their unusual power―and why its like has never been seen since.”

When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt, by Kara Cooney

“In The Performative Structure: Ritualizing th…

“In The Performative Structure: Ritualizing the Pyramid of Pepy I, Nils Billing investigates the ancient Egyptian pyramid complex as a performative structure, ritualized through the operative faculty inherent in monumental architecture, text, and image. The main body of research is given over to an analysis of the Pyramid Texts found in the pyramid of king Pepy I of the Sixth Dynasty (ca 2300 BCE). It is demonstrated that the texts were distributed on distinct space-bound thematic and ritual levels in order to perpetuate a cultic activity from which the lord of the tomb could be transformed by moving through the different chambers and corridors towards the exit. Just as the decoration program of the mortuary temple once delineated the ritual and ideological structure of the royal mortuary cult, the corpus of texts distributed in the pyramid provided a monumentalized performative structure that effectuated the perennial rebirth for its owner.”

― The Performative Structure.

(Harvard Egyptological Studies), by Nils Billing

“The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base f…

“The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. 

This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period.”

Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, by Sally Wallace-Jones

“This volume contains the proceedings of the t…

“This volume contains the proceedings of the twenty-third Annual Egyptological Colloquium, held at the British Museum in 2014, augmented by additional papers. The twenty-three contributions investigate functionality, iconography and manufacture of ancient Egyptian coffins from the First Intermediate Period to the eighth century AD. The authors explore the conceptual aspects which lay behind the production of coffins through the study of iconography and texts, examining the functional role of these complex objects as ‘structured compositions’ which were designed to play an important part in transforming the deceased occupants and perpetuating their existence beyond death. Reinstating coffins in their archaeological and societal contexts, the papers reflect on the circumstances in which they were made, considering workshop practices and regional variability, and studying coffins not only individually but also as components of larger conceptual entities in which the mummy, the burial chamber and the tomb itself all had specific meanings. Several contributions focus on areas of current interest, such as the post-burial adaptation and reuse of coffins, considering how these issues relate to the economic environment in which they were made and to changing attitudes towards the immutability of burial arrangements.”

Ancient Egyptian Coffins: Craft traditions and functionality, Taylor, J. & M. Vandenbeusch, eds., British Museum Publications on Egypt and Sudan 4, London, Peeters Publishers

“At the end of the 19th century W.M.F. Petrie …

“At the end of the 19th century W.M.F. Petrie excavated a series of assemblages at the New Kingdom Fayum site of Gurob. These deposits, known in the Egyptological literature as ‘Burnt Groups’, were composed by several and varied materials (mainly Egyptian and imported pottery, faience, stone and wood vessels, jewellery), all deliberately burnt and buried in the harem palace area of the settlement. Since their discovery these deposits have been considered peculiar and unparalleled. Many scholars were challenged by them and different theories were formulated to explain these enigmatic ‘Burnt Groups.’

The materials excavated from these assemblages are now curated at several Museum collections across England: Ashmolean Museum, British Museum, Manchester Museum, and Petrie Museum. For the first time since their discovery, this book presents these materials all together. Gasperini has studied and visually analysed all the items. This research sheds new light on the chronology of deposition of these assemblages, additionally a new interpretation of their nature, primary deposition, and function is presented in the conclusive chapter. The current study also gives new information on the abandonment of the Gurob settlement and adds new social perspective on a crucial phase of the ancient Egyptian history: the transition between the late New Kingdom and the early Third Intermediate Period. Beside the traditional archaeological sources, literary evidence (‘The Great Tomb Robberies Papyri’) is taken into account to formulate a new theory on the deposition of these assemblages.”

Tomb Robberies at the End of the New Kingdom: The Gurob Burnt Groups Reinterpreted, by Valentina Gasperini

“Life can be a challenge when your mother gi…

“Life can be a challenge when your mother gives your friends dead mice in your birthday goody bags and offers to mummify your class pet bunny. Amun Ra (yes, like the Egyptian god) shares the story of his endlessly embarrassing and unconventional life with his Mummy, the famous Egyptologist Amilas Marquis.

He regales his readers with adventures of crossing continents, of narrow escapes with stolen artifacts, of death defying run-ins with scorpions, not to mention the humiliation in the face of his peers, with his mother’s graphic stories of ancient rites and severed body parts. Along the way, he shares his knowledge about ancient Egypt and the modern Middle East, as well as Europe and North America.”

Fun Things to Do with Dead Animals: Egyptology, Ruins, My Life, by

Eden Unger Bowditch, Salima Ikram.

The American University in Cairo Press.

“Pharaoh Seti I ruled Egypt for only 11 years …

“Pharaoh Seti I ruled Egypt for only 11 years (1290-1279 BC), but his reign marked a revival of Egyptian military and economic power, as well as cultural and religious life. Seti was born the son of a military officer in northern Egypt, far from the halls of power in Memphis and Thebes. However, when the last king of the 18th Dynasty, Horemheb, died without an heir, Seti’s father was named king. He ruled for only two years before dying of old age, leaving Seti in charge of an ailing superpower. 

Seti set about rebuilding Egypt after a century of dynastic struggles and religious unrest. He reasserted Egypt’s might with a series of campaigns across the Levant, Libya and Nubia. He despatched expeditions to mine for copper, gold, and quarry for stone in the deserts, laying the foundations for one of the most ambitious building projects of any Egyptian Pharaoh and his actions allowed his son, Ramesses the Great to rule in relative peace and stability for 69 years, building on the legacy of his father.”

― Pharaoh Seti I: Father of Egyptian Greatness, by Nicky Nielsen

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