Category: egyptology

“This book is dedicated to the iconography, the epithets, and the theology of one of the most important and worshipped Goddesses not only of Egypt but of the entire Ancient World, and therefore of all Europe and the whole Western civilization: the Goddess Isis. Here you will find more that 160 images of Isis, and almost all of them are color and full page photographs, from Egyptian Temples, “Houses of Eternity”, coffins, etc. , and more that 1500 epithets of the Goddess, and of each epithet is reported the transliteration from Hieroglyphic, the English translation, and the sources. 

This volume is divided into two parts: the first part is dedicated to the iconography of Isis in anthropomorphic form, while the second part to the iconography of Isis represented in animal forms and in the composite forms of woman and animal; each part contains a description of the most important elements of Her iconography and an analysis, through the epithets, of the aspects of Her theology in connection with the symbolism of Her iconography, followed by an iconographic section with the images of the Goddess. The aim of this study is to reconstruct in the most detailed and complete way possible the various aspects of the theology of Isis through the analysis of Her epithets and to provide the keys to understand the symbolism of Her iconography in the light of Her theology.”

Egyptian Gods Iconography and Theology: the Goddess Isis – I part, by Luigi Tripani

Statue of Prince Horemakhet
He was son of Shabaqo (third Kushite pharaoh) and High Priest of Amun in Thebes during the reing of his father and his two successors
25th Dynasty (Black Pharaohs)
Nubia Museum at Aswan
.
#archeology #nubia #kush #amazingegypt #ancientegypt #ancient #ancient_history #egyptianmuseum #egyptology #egyptianmagic #iloveegypt #pharaoh #thegiftsofmindfulness #iregipto #egyptpassion #retreat #yoga #inspiration #alchemistofunconditionallove
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❝How beautiful is it when someone looks at you, as if seeing themselves within the Universe inside you.❞

#sea #thisisegypt #egyptologist #temple #myegypt #egyptianhistory #egyptology #archeology #hieroglyphs #madeinegypt #egypte #egyptians #egyptshots #loveegypt #discoveregypt #papyrus #bookofthedead #IREGIPTO
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An Egyptian workman happily carries a 4,500-year-old statue of an Old Kingdom scribe. The sculpture spent four decades in a storeroom in the Giza Plateau after it was discovered. It was then transported from Giza to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, so that it can be displayed with other long-hidden masterpieces as part of the celebration of the museum centennial in 2002. Photo (edited): Kenneth Garrett in National Geographic Magazine, January 2003.

The workman looks as if he’s embracing a long lost relative!
#thegiftsofmindfulness #iregipto #egyptpassion #retreat #yoga #inspiration #alchemistofunconditionallove #egyptpassion_ #giza #egyptiantart #egyptiangoddess #egyptology #archeology
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“One of the world’s oldest treaties provides the backdrop for a new analysis of the Egyptian concept of hetep (“peace”). To understand the full range of meaning of hetep, Peace in Ancient Egypt explores battles against Egypt’s enemies, royal offerings to deities, and rituals of communing with the dead. Vanessa Davies argues that hetep is the result of action that is just, true, and in accord with right order (maat). Central to the concept of hetep are the issues of rhetoric and community. Beyond detailing the ancient Egyptian concept of hetep, it is hoped that this book will provide a useful framework that can be considered in relation to concepts of peace in other cultures.”

― Peace in Ancient Egypt (Harvard Egyptological Studies), by Vanessa Davies

“Egyptian society is often said to have been divided into social classes, with the pat -people representing the ‘elite’ and the rxyt -people being the ‘commoners’. The aim of this study is to provide the first comprehensive analysis of the role of the rxyt -people in Egyptian religion by utilizing both text and iconography. This includes exploring their identity, their participation in Egyptian rituals and temple festivals, and a detailed examination of the rxyt rebus.”

― 

All the Rxyt-people Adore: The Role of the Rekhyt-people in Egyptian Religion (GHP Egyptology), by Kenneth Griffin

“In today’s political landscape, female rulers are few and far between, But thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme, controlling the authoritarian state as power brokers in times of war and peace. Even with their success, these political masterminds were just as often used as pawns in a patriarchal society. Through the seductive lens of six remarkable female pharaohs―including Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra―celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney explains how these women ruled and what made ancient Egypt unique among history’s greatest empires. Her remarkable book illuminates the complexities of their unusual power―and why its like has never been seen since.”

When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt, by Kara Cooney

“In today’s political landscape, female rulers are few and far between, But thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme, controlling the authoritarian state as power brokers in times of war and peace. Even with their success, these political masterminds were just as often used as pawns in a patriarchal society. Through the seductive lens of six remarkable female pharaohs―including Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra―celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney explains how these women ruled and what made ancient Egypt unique among history’s greatest empires. Her remarkable book illuminates the complexities of their unusual power―and why its like has never been seen since.”

When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt, by Kara Cooney

“In The Performative Structure: Ritualizing the Pyramid of Pepy I, Nils Billing investigates the ancient Egyptian pyramid complex as a performative structure, ritualized through the operative faculty inherent in monumental architecture, text, and image. The main body of research is given over to an analysis of the Pyramid Texts found in the pyramid of king Pepy I of the Sixth Dynasty (ca 2300 BCE). It is demonstrated that the texts were distributed on distinct space-bound thematic and ritual levels in order to perpetuate a cultic activity from which the lord of the tomb could be transformed by moving through the different chambers and corridors towards the exit. Just as the decoration program of the mortuary temple once delineated the ritual and ideological structure of the royal mortuary cult, the corpus of texts distributed in the pyramid provided a monumentalized performative structure that effectuated the perennial rebirth for its owner.”

― The Performative Structure.

(Harvard Egyptological Studies), by Nils Billing

“The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. 

This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period.”

Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, by Sally Wallace-Jones