Category: archaeology

Egypt uncovers Old Kingdom cemetery

Egypt’s antiquities ministry unveiled a 4,500-year-old burial ground near the Giza pyramids containing colorful wooden coffins and limestone statues dating back to the Old Kingdom.

The site on the southeastern side of Giza plateau contains tombs and burial shafts from various periods, but the oldest is a limestone family tomb from the fifth dynasty (around 2500 BC), the ministry said.

The tomb was that of two people: Behnui-Ka, who had seven titles including the Priest and the Judge, and Nwi, also known as Chief of the Great State and “purifier” of the king Khafra.

Read more.

Archaeologists uncover ancient tomb with mummies

The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry said in a statement that the tomb is from the Graeco-Roman period, which began with Alexander the Great in 332 B.C.

It is located near one of Aswan’s landmarks, the Mausoleum of Aga Khan, who lobbied for Muslim rights in India and who was buried there after his death in 1957.

The statement said archaeologists found artifacts, including decorated masks, statuettes, vases, coffin fragments and cartonnages—chunks of linen or papyrus glued together. Read more.

Archaeologists Discover A New Profession In An Ancient Egyptian Woman’s Teeth

Some archaeologists rejoice in opening graves that have been sealed for millennia, while others marvel when their lab work reveals the hidden past of a particular person. During routine analysis of a skeletal collection from ancient Mendes, two archaeologists discovered odd tooth wear in an older Egyptian woman that suggested her body had more to tell them about her life.

The skeleton was originally excavated in the late 1970s by the NYU Institute of Fine Arts Expedition to Mendes, along with 67 others. The site was the capital of ancient Egypt during the 29th Dynasty, or roughly the 4th century BC, but it was occupied continuously for a total of about 5,000 years. In addition to being a capital, Mendes was a trade hub and religious cult center, and archaeologists have also found residential and burial areas. 

In the 1990s, new excavation by Nancy Lovell of the University of Alberta and her team produced additional bodies, for a total of 92. These burials appeared to be of middle-class people based on burial style. However, the grave of this particular older woman, which dated to 2181-2055 BC, was rich and elaborate compared to others in the area. Her skeleton had been placed in a wooden coffin, and her journey to the afterlife was outfitted with alabaster vessels, a bronze mirror, and cosmetics. In going through the human remains from Mendes, Lovell, along with her former student Kimberley Palichuk, noticed something intriguing in her teeth. Read more.

Ptolemaic-era tomb discovered in Upper Egypt’s Sohag

An exceptionally well-painted Ptolemaic-era tomb of a nobleman called Toutou and his wife, a musician, was discovered at Al-Dayabat archaeological site in Sohag governorate.

The tomb was accidentally discovered when the Tourism and Antiquities Police arrested a gang who were carrying out illegal excavations in an area near the Al-Dayabat archaeological mound.

The tomb consists of two tiny rooms containing two limestone sarcophagi, as well as a very-well preserved mummy that has not been identified yet. A number of mummified animals and birds were also found in the tomb, including falcons, eagles, cats, dogs and shrews. Read more.

Temple Palace of Ramesses II Unearthed in Abydos

A temple palace belonging to pharaoh Ramesses II (r. ca. 1279-1213 BC) has been discovered at the Egyptian site of Abydos, north of Luxor.

New York University archaeologists excavating south of the temple uncovered a stone walkway leading to a limestone and mudbrick palace building similar in layout to the nearby palace of Ramesses’ father, Seti I (r. ca. 1290-1279 BC). Read more.

Temple Palace of Ramesses II Unearthed in Abydos

A temple palace belonging to pharaoh Ramesses II (r. ca. 1279-1213 BC) has been discovered at the Egyptian site of Abydos, north of Luxor.

New York University archaeologists excavating south of the temple uncovered a stone walkway leading to a limestone and mudbrick palace building similar in layout to the nearby palace of Ramesses’ father, Seti I (r. ca. 1290-1279 BC). Read more.

60 Ancient Egyptian Mummies Entombed Together Died ‘Bloody, Fearsome Deaths’

More than 4,000 years ago in Egypt, dozens of men who died of terrible wounds were mummified and entombed together in the cliffs near Luxor. Mass burials were exceptionally rare in ancient Egypt — so why did all these mummies end up in the same place?

Recently, archaeologists visited the mysterious Tomb of the Warriors in Deir el Bahari, Egypt; the tomb had been sealed after its discovery in 1923. After analyzing evidence from the tomb and other sites in Egypt, they pieced together the story of a desperate and bloody chapter in Egypt’s history at the close of the Old Kingdom, around 2150 B.C. 

Archaeologist Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, investigated the mummies with a camera crew in late September 2018, with the cooperation of the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and the assistance of local experts, Davina Bristow, documentary producer and director, told Live Science. Read more.

60 Ancient Egyptian Mummies Entombed Together Died ‘Bloody, Fearsome Deaths’

More than 4,000 years ago in Egypt, dozens of men who died of terrible wounds were mummified and entombed together in the cliffs near Luxor. Mass burials were exceptionally rare in ancient Egypt — so why did all these mummies end up in the same place?

Recently, archaeologists visited the mysterious Tomb of the Warriors in Deir el Bahari, Egypt; the tomb had been sealed after its discovery in 1923. After analyzing evidence from the tomb and other sites in Egypt, they pieced together the story of a desperate and bloody chapter in Egypt’s history at the close of the Old Kingdom, around 2150 B.C. 

Archaeologist Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, investigated the mummies with a camera crew in late September 2018, with the cooperation of the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and the assistance of local experts, Davina Bristow, documentary producer and director, told Live Science. Read more.

Nile shipwreck discovery proves Herodotus right – after 2,469 years

Greek historian’s description of ‘baris’ vessel vindicated by archaeologists at sunken city of Thonis-Heraclion

In the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of his Historia, the ancient world’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”.

For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around the sunken port city of Thonis-Heracleion has revealed just how accurate the historian was.

“It wasn’t until we discovered this wreck that we realised Herodotus was right,” said Dr Damian Robinson, director of Oxford University’s centre for maritime archaeology, which is publishing the excavation’s findings. “What Herodotus described was what we were looking at.” Read more.

archaeologicalnews:

Missing pieces of a miniature model boat buried with ancient Egyptian king Tutankhamun have been found in museum storage.

The box of artifacts packed by Howard Carter — the British archaeologist who first opened Tut’s tomb in 1922 — was recently rediscovered in a storeroom at the Luxor Museum.

“It’s the most exciting discovery in my career,” Mohamed Atwa, the museum’s director of archaeology and information, who found the box, said in a statement. “It’s amazing that after all these years we still have new discoveries and new secrets for this golden king, Tutankhamun.”

Atwa found the model boat pieces while gathering artifacts from Tut’s tomb at the Luxor Museum in preparation for an exhibit at the Grand Egyptian Museum, a new museum near the pyramids of Giza that is scheduled to open next year. Read more.