Category: 4th dynasty

Khafre Enthroned Diorite statue of Khafre, …

Khafre Enthroned

Diorite statue of Khafre, king of the 4th Dynasty in the Old Kingdom in Egypt (around 2500 BC). It is now located in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Ancient Egyptian beadnet dress

Ancient Egyptian beadnet dress

Made of Egyptian faience. From Tomb G 7440 Z at Giza, excavated by the Harvard University-Museum of Fine Arts Expedition, 1927. 

Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, reign of King Khufu, ca. 2551-2528 BC. Now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Old Kingdom Hieroglyphs

Old Kingdom Hieroglyphs

Fragment of a relief from Mastaba of prince Nefermaat, Meidum. Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613-2494 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

Menkaure Triad Menkaure was the builder of …

Menkaure Triad

Menkaure was the builder of what is known as the third pyramid, the smallest of the three pyramids at Giza in Egypt. 

The goddess Hathor is on his right and the personification of Cynopolis, the 17th nome of Upper Egypt, is on his left. He wears the crown of Upper Egypt and has a false beard. He wears the short pleated Shendyt kilt and holds two small cylindrical objects.

The two ladies wear tight fitting dresses and have three-part wigs. They each hold in one hand the Shen sign of power and embrace the king with the other hand.

Hathor wears her usual crown, composed of the sun disk between the two cow horns, while the other lady is placed beneath a jackal, the symbol of her nome.

The text engraved on the base identifies them and records the different offerings given to the king from the nome.

This sculpted triad, made of

graywacke, a three-person statue, shows King Menkaure between two ladies, Hathor and Cynopolis. Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613-2494 BC.

Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

JE 46499. Heritage Images.

Queen Meresankh III and her mother Hete…

Queen

Meresankh III

and her mother

Hetepheres II

Niche statues from the Tomb of queen Meresankh III. Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613 to 2494 BC. Tomb G7530-5440, Giza.

Interior of the Tomb of Meresankh IIIQueen M…

Interior of the Tomb of Meresankh III

Queen Meresankh III was the daughter of Hetepheres II and prince Kawab and a granddaughter of king Khufu. She was the wife of king Khafra.

Her tomb was discovered by archaeologist George Reisner on April 23, 1927, with subsequent excavations undertaken by his team on behalf of Harvard University and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613 to 2494 BC. Tomb G7530-5440, Giza.

The Chapel of Queen Meresankh III

The Chapel of Queen Meresankh III

Meresankh III was the daughter of Hetepheres II and Prince Kawab and a granddaughter of the Egyptian pharaoh Khufu. She was the wife of King Khafre.

Her tomb was discovered by archaeologist George Reisner on April 23, 1927, with subsequent excavations undertaken by his team on behalf of Harvard University and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613 to 2494 BC. Tomb G7530-5440, Giza. Photo: Sandro Vannini

10 Awe-Inspiring Photos of the Ancient Pyram…

10 Awe-Inspiring Photos of the Ancient Pyramids of Egypt

Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt held immense power and were perceived to have been chosen by the gods. They were held in high regard even after death because it was believed that part of their spirit would remain with their bodies in the physical world. Through the process of mummification, a pharaoh would be prepared for the afterlife and buried in tombs alongside his most valuable possessions, including art, furniture, gold, food and other offerings.

The earliest forms of the pyramids, called “mastabas,” were royal tombs carved into rock and were very different from Egypt’s iconic pyramids. These tombs were rectangular and flat-roofed. By the start of the third dynasty, tombs in Egypt developed into more complex structures. Around 2630 B.C. an early pyramid built for King Djoser, called the Step Pyramid, stood 204 feet tall and was the highest structure of its time. Read more.

How Did Egyptians Build the Pyramids? Ancien…

How Did Egyptians Build the Pyramids? Ancient Ramp Find Deepens Mystery

Researchers in Egypt have discovered a 4,500-year-old ramp system used to haul alabaster stones out of a quarry, and news reports have suggested that it could provide clues as to how Egyptians built the pyramids. Yet while the ramp system is a significant technological discovery, the pyramid connection is still a bit of a stretch.

Archaeologists from the French Institute for Oriental Archaeology in Cairo and the University of Liverpool discovered the ramp system’s remains in an ancient alabaster quarry at Hatnub, a site in the Eastern Desert. The ramp system dates at least as far back as the reign of Pharaoh Khufu, who built the Great Pyramid at Giza. Read more

Some interesting facts on how the pyramids wer…

Some interesting facts on how the pyramids were built:

  • Khufu’s pyramid, known as the great pyramid of Giza, is the oldest and largest, rising at 481 feet (146 meters). Archaeologists say it was the tallest structure in the world for about 3, 800 years.
  • The sphinx is a 73.5-meter (241 ft.) long monument built during the reign of Khafra. The creature is a mythical being commonly found in Greek, Egyptian and even South Asian ancient architecture.
  • Khafra and Menkaure’s pyramids are much smaller and simpler in design than Khufu’s massive structure. When first built, the pyramids were covered in white limestone much of which eroded over the years.
  • Contrary to popular depictions, the Egyptian pyramids were not built by large groups of slaves or prisoners, many historians say. Egyptians were employed and archaeologist estimate the workers would have had to set a 2.5 to 15 ton block every two and a half minutes to finish Khufu’s pyramid in about 30 years.

Historians say the purpose of the pyramids was to house the king’s body after death. The Giza pyramids have elaborate tunnel systems inside containing gold and other objects Egyptians thought would be useful in the afterlife. 

Amazing Facts about the Great Pyramids of Giza