Category: 18th dynasty

Portrayal of Nubian wrestlers Relief depictin…

Portrayal of Nubian wrestlers

Relief depicting Nubian wrestlers,

five men marching together,

with the last man carrying a standard which has two wrestlers on it. The sticks that the first four Nubians brandished were used in a dueling competition. Depictions of stick fighting and wrestling competitions often appear together, implying that the same people participated in both events.

While it is known that the Egyptians recruited Nubian archers into their army, perhaps this picture implies that Nubian wrestlers were also highly esteemed by the Egyptians.

Detail of a wall painting from the Tomb of Tjanuny

(TT74), Royal Scribe, and Commander of Soldiers during the

reign of Thutmose III. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1479-1425 BC. Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, West Thebes.

Intact mass grave discovered in Gebel el-Silsi…

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A Swedish archaeological mission has discovered an ancient tomb dating to the 18th Dynasty in Upper Egypt’s Aswan governorate, a Ministry of Antiquities statement said on Thursday.

The mission, operating in

Gebel el-Silsila

area in Kom Ombo, Aswan, announced that the tomb was located five meters underground and consists of a burial chamber and two sided rooms without any decoration.

Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri said that ground water had damaged the interior of the rooms and some of the artifacts.

Despite the poor state of conservation of the tomb, the mission found three limestone sarcophagi, scarabs, amulets and remains of 50 skeletons – half belonging to children. Read more.

Nubian Tribute

Nubian Tribute

Nubian chiefs bringing presents to the King of Egypt, copy of an Ancient Egyptian wall painting from the Tomb of Amenhotep called Huy (TT40), Thebes, Viceroy of Kush under Tutankhamun.

Lithography from ‘The History of Mankind’, Vol.III, by Prof. Friedrich Ratzel, 1898

Vases in the shapes of a girl and a hedgehog…

Vases in the shapes of a girl and a hedgehog

from Tomb D11 at Abydos. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Thutmose III, ca. 1479-1425 BC. Now in the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.

Toilet Dish Held by a Figure of a Woman Floa…

Toilet Dish Held by a Figure of a Woman Floating

Ivory, 1 ¼ x 5 3/8 in. (3.1 x 13.7 cm)

New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1550-1292 BC. Now in the Brooklyn Museum.

The forecourt of Horemheb’s Memphite tom…

The forecourt of Horemheb’s Memphite tomb at Saqqara

New Kingdom, Late 18th Dynasty, ca. 1319-1292 BC.

The tomb from the time in which he was not yet Pharaoh Horemheb was discovered a first time in the 19th century, then it disappeared again under the sands. It was rediscovered in 1975 by Geoffrey Martin and his team who cleared the monument in four seasons of excavation.

Because of his unexpected rise to the throne, Horemheb had two tombs constructed for himself: the first – when he was a mere nobleman – at Saqqara near Memphis, and the other in the Valley of the Kings, West Thebes, in tomb KV57 as king.

Akhenaten and Nefertiti Painted limestone sta…

Akhenaten and Nefertiti

Painted limestone statuette of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, height: 22 cm. 

Amarna Period, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1345 BC. Now in the Louvre. Photograph: Leemage/Corbis

Cartouche of TutankhamunDetail from from the…

Cartouche of Tutankhamun

Detail from

from the decoration on the golden throne, in wood, gold leaf, silver, glass gems and precious stones, discovered in the Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62) whose name is here given as Tutankhaten – a relic from the time before the worship of Amun was restored and the king changed his name. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. Photo: Sandro Vannini

Gold Finger Ring

Gold Finger Ring

Finger-ring of gold, incised on the top with the name of Queen Neferneferuaten Nefertiti, from Tell el-Amarna, probably the Royal Tomb. Amarna Period, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1353-1336 BC. Now in the National Museums Scotland.

Face of Akhenaten

Face of Akhenaten

Close up of a statue depicting the face of Amenhotep IV (“Akhenaten”). Amarna Period, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1353-1336 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. Photo: Sandro Vannini