Mosque of Ibn Tulun located in Cairo, Egypt. I…

Mosque of Ibn Tulun
located in Cairo, Egypt. It is the oldest mosque in the city surviving in its original form, and is the largest mosque in Cairo in terms of land area.

The mosque was commissioned by Ahmad ibn Tulun, the Turkic Abbassid governor of Egypt from 868–884 whose rule was characterized by de facto independence. The historian al-Maqrizi lists the mosque’s construction start date as 876 AD, and the mosque’s original inscription slab identifies the date of completion as AH 265 (878/879).

The mosque was constructed on a small hill called Gebel Yashkur, “The Hill of Thanksgiving.” One local legend says that it is here that Noah’s Ark came to rest after the Deluge, instead of at Mount Ararat.

The grand congregational mosque was intended as the focal point of Ibn Tulun’s capital, al-Qata’i, which served as the center of administration for the Tulunid dynasty. The mosque originally was backed by Ibn Tulun’s palace, and a door adjacent to the minbar allowed him direct entry to the mosque. Al-Qata’i was razed in the early 10th century, AD, and the mosque is the only surviving structure. (at Cairo, Egypt)